Ski Boot Sizes & Selection

Choosing a pair of ski boots can be a daunting prospect and we would always recommend that you spend time visiting ski shops with professional staff, trying on boots and seeking advice.  We’ve included a few helpful notes below including a ski boot sizes chart. However, if you know what you want, you can find some great deals here at Action & Adventure.
 

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Of all the gear you need for skiing, your boots are the probably most important thing to get right. They are the basis for everything you do on the snow, and critically affect your comfort. As we said, we always recommend that you have boots professionally fitted if possible but if you know what you want and looking for a bargain by purchasing online then here is lots of choice.

There are a number of factors to take into account when deciding on the right purchase - ski boot sizes, foot shape and your level of ability.

Ski Boot Sizes

As well as the usual UK and Euro sizing you’ll often see Mondo point” size. The Mondo size is the length of your foot in cm so it is more consistent between boot brands. This measures the internal length of your foot inside the shell of the boot. The high performance and specific nature of boots will require a precise fit. Your prefered ski boot sizes may not necessarily be the same as the size of your everyday shoes so be sure to try a boot on.

Ski Boot Sizes Chart

 

U.K.

Euro

Mondo Size (cm)

U.S. Men's

U.S. Women's

3

35

21.5

-

5

3.5

35.5

22

-

5.5

4

36

22.5

4.5

6

4.5

37

23

5

6.5

5

37.5

23.5

5.5

7

5.5

38

24

6

7.5

6

39

24.5

6.5

8

6.5

40

25

7

8.5

7

40.5

25.5

7.5

9

7.5

41

26

8

9.5

8

42

26.5

8.5

10

8.5

43

27

9

10.5

9

43.5

27.5

9.5

11

9.5

44

28

10

11.5

10

44.5

28.5

10.5

12

10.5

45

29

11

12.5

11

45.5

29.5

11.5

13

11.5

46

30

12

-

12

47

30.5

13

-

13

48

31

14

-

14

50

31.5

15

-

 

Your skiing ability can be assessed as one of three simple categories: - beginner/recreational, intermediate and advanced/expert. Some ski boots are more suited to the more advanced, aggressive skier and others will be fine for beginner/recreational skiers who may place comfort ahead of outright performance. 

You will often see “boot flex” mentioned in the specifications of ski boots - This is the ability of the boot to bend forward at the ankle. While boots need to be stiff to provide control and support, they must also bend to allow skiers to maintain balance and absorb impact. The degree of flex of a boot is quoted as a number from 50 to 150. As a guide, stiffer, performance oriented boots for experts or racers might be rated above 100 whereas as boots for recreational skiers may be rated at the lower end of the range.

You will often find guidance on the performance level that the boot is suitable for, as well as the flex rating, in the retailer’s description detail.