Triathlon Wetsuit Sale

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  •    Items:
  • 1 to 30 of 80

Triathlon Wetsuit

Whether you’re about to compete in your first event or a seasoned veteran, it’s likely that a wetsuit for your triathlon swim is going to be one of the more expensive purchases that you make as a triathlete so we’ve tried to find a selection of triathlon wetsuit sale items to match any budget.

Prices of triathlon wetsuits range from around £70 for an entry-level suit through to top-end suits for £400 and more. Of course, if you’re just starting out you may choose to hire a suit for your triathlon swim but we assume that you'll be in the sport for many years to come and looking for a wetsuit to buy rather than rent.

Wetsuits become 'optional' in most cases at 14 degrees C and swim distances are limited below this with 500m being the maximum recommended distance at 11 degrees C and no swimming should take place if it's colder than that.

Triathlon wetsuits are fairly technical performance items, usually constructed of up to three separate parts - legs, top and hood, but you are not allowed to use boots or gloves in a race. The maximum thickness of the neoprene is limited to 5mm and there are some other highly technical bits about distribution of the various thicknesses but you don’t have to worry about that too much for normal use. Any suit from the major manufacturers shown above will be a legal suit for competing.

Even if you save money on a triathlon wetsuit sale item, it’s likely to be a significant investment, especially when you consider that you'll probably only use it half a dozen times a year. It can be hard to justify spending more than a bare minimum but inevitably, the more expensive the suit, the more flexible it will be and, generally, the better it will fit. You can choose different suit types such as sleeveless or even a shorty but you need to be pretty tough and a good swimmer to get by in one of these in most of the British waters.  Women, have a different body shape to men so should look for suits specifically designed for them. That said, there are plenty of women out there swimming in a man's suit because it fits their body shape better. As with choosing a bike, get one that fits right and ignore the label.

With proper care and attention you will get several seasons of use out of a quality suit. Indeed, apart from physical damage there's little that can fail other than the rubber itself or the stitching. Check the seams, they can usually be re-taped, glued and stitched if they show signs of wear, and if the suit seems to be holding water like a sponge then it's a sign that the neoprene is failing and time to buy a new one.

Always wash the suit with clean warm water and dry it in the open air (but not in direct sunlight) after use. Store the suit flat and, if you have to fold it, do it as lightly you can.  For long term storage such as over-wintering turn the suit inside out and store flat in a cool place